Learn About: Evaluating Performance | Common Core
Home > Public education > Eight characteristics of effective school boards: At a glance > Eight characteristics of effective school boards: references
| print Print


Eight characteristics of effective school boards: references

Bartusek, L. (Ed.) (2000). IASB’s Lighthouse Study: School Boards and Student Achievement.
Des Moines, IA: Iowa Association of School Boards, Iowa School Board Compass, Vol. V, No. 2, Fall 2000.

Delagardelle, M. (2008). The Lighthouse Inquiry: Examining the Role of School Board Leadership in the Improvement of Student Achievement. In T. Alsbury (Ed.), The Future of School Board Governance: Relevancy and Revelation. Blue Ridge, PA: Rowman & Littlefield.

Goodman, R.H., Fulbright, L., and Zimmerman, W.G. (1997). Getting There from Here: School Board-Superintendent Collaboration Creating a School Governance Team Capable of Raising Student Achievement, 1997. Arlington, VA: Educational Research Service and New England School Development Council.

LaMonte, H., Delagardelle, M., and Vander Zyl, T., (2007). The Lighthouse Research: Past, Present and Future: School Board Leadership for Improving Student Achievement. Des Moines, IA: Iowa School Boards Foundation, Information Briefing, April 2007, Vol. 1, No. 9.

Land, D. (2002). Local School Boards Under Review: Their Role and Effectiveness in Relation to
Students’ Academic Achievement.
Baltimore, MD: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed At Risk, Johns Hopkins University.

LaRocque, L., and Coleman, P. (1993). The Politics of Excellence: Trustee Leadership and School District Ethos. Alberta, Canada: The Alberta Journal of Educational Research XXXIX(4): 449-475.

Rice, R., Delagardelle, M., Buckton, M., Jons, C., Lueders, W., Vens, M.J., Joyce, B., Wolf, J., Weathersby, J. (2001). The Lighthouse Inquiry: School Board/Superintendent Team Behaviors in School Districts with Extreme Differences in Student Achievement. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Association of School Boards, Paper Presented at the American Educational Research Association 2001 Annual Meeting.

Snipes, J., Doolittle, F., and Herlihy, C. (2002). Foundations for Success: Case Studies of How Urban School Systems Improve Student Achievement—An Abstract. Washington, D.C.: MDRC for the Council of Great City Schools.

Togneri, W., and Anderson, S. (2003). Beyond Islands of Excellence: What Schools Can Do to Improve Instruction and Achievement in All Schools. Baltimore, MD: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development and Learning First Alliance.

Waters, J.T., and Marzano, R. (2006). School District Leadership That Works: The Effect of Superintendent Leadership on Student Achievement: Meta-analysis of Influence of District Administrators on Student Achievement. Denver, CO: Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning.


Posted January 28, 2011. Copyright Center for Public Education.

This report was written by Chuck Dervarics and Eileen O'Brien. O’Brien is an independent education researcher and consultant in Alexandria, Virginia. Much of her work has focused on access to quality education for disadvantaged and minority populations. O’Brien has a Master of Public Administration from George Washington University and a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology from Loyola University, Chicago. Chuck Dervarics is an education writer and former editor of Report on Preschool Programs, a national independent newsletter on pre-k, Head Start, and child care policy. As a writer and researcher, he has contributed to case studies and research projects of the Southern Education Foundation, the American Council on Education, and the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, often focusing on issues facing disadvantaged populations. Dervarics has a Bachelors degree from George Washington University.
Home > Public education > Eight characteristics of effective school boards: At a glance > Eight characteristics of effective school boards: references

Inside This Section

Pre-Kindergarten
Investing in high-quality pre-kindergarten education yields benefits for kids, school, and communities.
Read More
Data First
How good are your schools? How can they improve? Data can provide answers.
Read More